SUBSCRIBE FOR EMAILS
  • Grey Facebook Icon
  • Grey Instagram Icon
  • Grey Twitter Icon
CONTACT US

+63.998.547.5760

 

Mailing address:

Bethel -  Place of Solitude

c/o Bishop's House,

Iba, Zambales 2201

 

bethel.zambales@gmail.com

Life is a project of building bridges, bridges that connect one with others, the world, and God to one’s self. Please feel free to get in touch with us for prayer intentions, to schedule your own desert days, or even just to say thank you or God bless to spread love and kindness.

ABOUT US

© Bethel - Place of Solitude.

Universal Need For Solitude

November 11, 2005

've just started with this blog to start sharing reflections on contemporary people's increasing need for solitude. It is not so much a form of simply being alone from the sometimes imposing and constricting presence of other people, be they be friends or foe, but something much deeper than a simple sense of wanting to be a alone. The solitude of which Bethel speaks is not an escape, but a response to a singular call to be with someone--God. The solitude that Christian tradition speaks of is precisely this, that God lovingly calls us to be with him, to be alone with him.

The apostles returned to Jesus and told him all they had done and taught. And he said to them, "Come away to some lonely place all by yourselves and rest for a while" (Mk. 6: 30-31a). 

The practice of spending moments of prayer and silence has been part of the tradition in the Church since her very beginning. From the time when Jesus welcomed back his disciples after sending them on a mission; to the time when St. Anthony of Egypt (c. 251- 356 AD) received the divine call to go to the desert, initiating the hermitic tradition in Christianity; to the formation of monasteries and secluded convents (c. 6th century); up to the present generation, solitude has been the backbone of the spiritual legacy of the Church. The Old Testament narrates of countless instances of “going to the desert” to pray and encounter Yahweh. But the singular model for us remains the solitary figure of Jesus who goes “to the mountain to pray, spending the night in communion with God” (Lk. 6: 12). 

To enter into solitude is not a thing that we make when we are already tired and we wish only to rest and be left alone. To enter into solitude is to respond to a call of God who loves us and wants to be with us: “I will lead her into the wilderness: and I will speak to her heart” (Hosea 2: 14).

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Featured Posts

Merging our story with God's plan

September 8, 2015

1/3
Please reload

Recent Posts

July 9, 2015

Please reload

Archive
Please reload

Search By Tags
Please reload

Follow Us
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square